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Melinda Josie
Illustration of Gordon “Oz” Osinski

Gordon “Oz” Osinski

Professor, Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science

New appointment:

Co-investigator on NASA’s Artemis III Mission Geology Team (the only individual from a Canadian institution on the team).

What I do:

My research focuses on understanding the geological processes that shape the surface of the Earth, moon and Mars. As part of the Artemis III geology team, I’m excited to have the opportunity to share my knowledge with the astronauts and empower them to become field geologists.

Why I do it:

I have always been drawn to exploring the most remote parts of Earth, from the Canadian Arctic to Antarctica. While I would love to go to the moon myself, training and supporting the Artemis astronauts is the next best thing—and a significant highlight of my career so far.


Illustration of Nicole Redvers

Nicole Redvers

Professor and Director, Indigenous Planetary Health, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry

New appointment:

One of 13 members of the World Health Organization’s Technical Advisory Group on Embedding Ethics in Health and Climate Change Policy

What I do:

I promote the inclusion of Indigenous perspectives in human and planetary health research and practice, ensuring Indigenous voices are heard in policy and research discussions. My goal is to bridge gaps between Indigenous and Western ways of knowing as it relates to Indigenous health and well-being, and the well-being of the planet.

Why I do it:

I was born and raised in the Northwest Territories and saw health inequities in Indigenous communities and how climate affects our landscapes. I carry a personal responsibility for the health of our Indigenous communities and for the lands and waters on which our health depends.


Illustration Dr. Robyn Klein

Dr. Robyn Klein

Professor, Microbiology & Immunology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry

New appointment:

Canada Excellence Research Chair in Neurovirology and Neuroimmunology 

What I do:

I work to understand how emerging viruses impact brain function, merging neuroscience, immunology, and infectious diseases. I study how memories are formed and the impact of viruses on this process, because many viruses, like SARS-CoV-2 (that causes COVID-19), affect memory.

Why I do it:

I like scientific puzzles and the surprises and creativity of science. It’s exciting when someone does an experiment, and the results are the opposite of what we expected. I’m also committed to challenging the marginalization of women in science and combating the notion our contributions are somehow less impactful. I want to improve the experiences of women trainees, so they have a more seamless experience with more mentorship and inclusion.